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Whitsundays Wildlife

Showing 1 - 10 of 27 Articles

Life in the Whitsundays is all about balance, conservation and the protection of wildlife and natural habitats. Part of that balance means sacrifice and conservation in the form of 'planned burns' which sometimes take place on some of the Whitsunday islands. A planned burn is the use of fire under very controlled and strategic conditions to decrease forest fuels such as dead trees or natural debris. This means that fires are lit very intentionally and with great care and thought to remove potential hazards and to burn forest waste.

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The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority is the most important the integral authority in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, a huge area that spans 344,400 km2.

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Eye on the Reef is a program throughout the Great Barrier Reef that enables the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) to help further its conservation and protection through surveys and and monitoring done by everyday people including tourists and locals! 

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It's said that the whales will come to the Whitsundays early this year. Usually migrating up the coast in June - August, locals are saying that the whales will make their annual appearance earlier than normal in 2018.  

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The Whitsundays has been on a quick mend in the wake of Cyclone Debbie, dealing with the cleanup and damages associated with the storm. Among those affected are the abundant wildlife, who too had to whether the storm and are also dealing with the aftermath. With many habitats destroyed and thorough cleanup process ahead, wildlife carers ask that locals take extra care when tidying, taking down trees or doing general cleanup. Many of the native tree, flower and shrub species were damaged in the storm, which serve as homes and food sources for many native animals, leaving them hungry or without proper shelter

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The idea of hand feeding a wild bird for the perfect photo op or the chance to say that you got up close and personal with a cockatoo or lorikeet is a tempting to even the most cautious animal lover. However, while it might seem cool and worth it, there is a potential that you could cause harm to the animal or cause irreversible behavioural changes that it will live with for a lifetime.

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The Great Barrier Reef Marine park is home to an estimated 175 bird species, many of which live permanently in the Whitsundays area. With a variety of birds, from high-fliers to those that wade in the shallows, you can see every combination of colour, size and mannerisms in the beautiful abundance of birds in the Whitsundays.

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The Proserpine rock-wallaby is an endangered species of wallaby that lives in rocky outcrops and ledges in Northern Queensland, and has been on the endangered list since 1992. Small, brown and agreeably very cute, they are shy around people and spend most of their days sleeping in sheltered areas.

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They are generally more inquisitive and friendly with humans which coexist along the beaches in the Whitsundays and around the islands.

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The Whitsundays is home to the colourful and friendly Rainbow Lorikeet bird, which is a common species of bird along the coast.

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